Open House: Historic Goodsill Residence, April 5

Photos courtesy of Victoria Sambunaris and Ian Clagstone

Historic Hawai’i Foundation and Stephan Jost will host an Historic Home Open House at the Marshall & Ruth Goodsill Residence, a Vladimir Ossipoff modern Hawaiian-style Home in the Wai‘alae – Kāhala area of Honolulu. The event will be held on Saturday, April 5, 2014 from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.

  • WHAT: Historic Home Open House with Pūpū & Wine
  • WHEN: Saturday, April 5th
  • WHERE: Wai’alae-Kāhala (Location address will be provided upon ticket purchase)
  • TIME: From 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m.
  • COST: $25 for HHF members/$50 general admission
  • TICKETS:  hhf2014goodsillopenhouse.eventbrite.com

All proceeds benefit the programs & services of Historic Hawaii Foundation

Enjoy a rare glimpse into a modern masterpiece by renowned architect Vladimir Ossipoff. The Marshall and Ruth Goodsill residence sits on a slightly sloping, almost one-acre lot on a serene side street in Wai‘alae-Kāhala. Learn the private design elements of this classic Ossipoff creation on the house tour with a knowledgeable docent at your side. Afterwards relax and socialize over pūpū and wine.

The residence is significant as an excellent example of an early 1950s house designed by a master, Vladimir Ossipoff. Rendered in a modern Hawaiian style, this house was one of a number of fashionable residences designed by Ossipoff in the 1950s, which established his reputation as the premier architect of the period in Honolulu. Other houses of the period designed by this superb architect include: the LeRoy Bush residence on Tantalus, E. J. Greaney residence near Diamond Head, Dr. Liljestrand residence, Linus Pauling residence, and Blanche Hill residence in Kahala (No Longer Extant).

In addition to many splendid modern Hawaiian style houses, Ossipoff also designed the Pacific Club (1960), the Outrigger Canoe Club (1963), the Thurston Memorial Chapel on the Punahou School campus (1966), Bachman Hall on the University of Hawaii campus (1949), and the Liberty, now American Savings, Bank (1952) at the corner of King and Smith streets in Honolulu’s Chinatown Historic District (HR, NR).

The house is immaculately detailed in a very clean, straight-line design. The presence of Japanese elements, reflect the architect’s up-bringing in Japan as well as the larger cultural milieu of Hawaii that embodies the belief that the islands are the “Cross-Roads of the Pacific,” where East meets West in a harmonious manner.

Please join HHF for this Special Open House Event!

 

2017-04-21T01:01:40+00:00 March 11th, 2014|Categories: Education Programs|