Preservation

ANNOUNCING Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2016!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 79 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2016 sites are: Ala Kahakai Mauka to Makai Trails Ninole Stream Bridge Kaniakapupu Ruins Loko Ea Piliaama Stone Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.  

2017-06-07T15:16:17+00:00 November 8th, 2016|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2015!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 74 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2015 sites are: Līhu‘e Shell Station, Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i Omega Station/Haiku Stairs, Haiku Valley, O‘ahu Kanewai Spring Complex, Kuli‘ou‘ou, O‘ahu Star of the Sea Church, Kaimu, Hawai‘i Island Ierusalema Hou Church, Hālawa Valley, Moloka‘i Quonset Huts at Pohauloa Training Area, Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA), Hawai‘i Island Kapuāiwa Coconut Grove, Hoolehua, Moloka‘i Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.      

2017-04-21T01:01:12+00:00 November 4th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Join the National Trust’s “Places that Matter” Campaign

Put the Spotlight on Places that Matter If you're reading this post we know you care about historic places. Do you have favorites that whisper their stories into the wind and represent important moments in our nation's past or your own?  What if you could share these places with the world and encourage others to recognize them and care too?  Now you can.  Thanks to the National Trust for Historic Preservation's online campaign to connect people with places that matter across the country (and globe!). Let's put Hawaii on the map!  Our history is like no other and needs to be shared.  Join with Historic Hawaii Foundation and encourage your colleagues, friends and family to help us post photos of Hawai‘i’s many historic sites & buildings to share why #thisplacematters.   It’s easy and fun! Instructions are at this link: https://savingplaces.org/this-place-matters#.VilEPNOFOM8 You can download and print your own sign or ask the National Trust to send you a sign or flag.  Then go out and hit the town and countryside taking photos of places that matter most to you.  Share your photos online with the hashtag #ThisPlaceMatters.  Post to our Twitter (@HistoricHawaii) and Facebook page.   Share why this place matters to you.  

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 October 23rd, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , |

The History Relevance Campaign’s Statement on Why History Matters

The attached statement was created by the American Association for State and Local History.  It's a good reminder of why what we do matters. For more information about the History Relevance Campaign & 10 ways to apply the value statement visit historyrelevance.com ____________________________ THE VALUE OF HISTORY SEVEN WAYS IT IS ESSENTIAL» TO OURSELVES IDENTITY » History nurtures personal identity in an intercultural world.  History enables people to discover their own place in the stories of their families, communities, and nation. They learn the stories of the many individuals and groups that have come before them and shaped the world in which they live. There are stories of freedom and equality, injustice and struggle, loss and achievement, and courage and triumph. Through these varied stories, they create systems of personal values that guide their approach to life and relationships with others.  CRITICAL SKILLS » History teaches critical 21st century skills and independent thinking. The practice of history teaches research, judgment of the accuracy and reliability of sources, validation of facts, awareness of multiple perspectives and biases, analysis of conflicting evidence, sequencing to discern causes, synthesis to present a coherent interpretation, clear and persuasive written and oral communication, and other skills that have been identified as critical to a successful and productive life in the 21st century  TO OUR COMMUNITIES VITAL PLACES TO LIVE AND WORK » History lays the groundwork for strong, resilient communities. No place really becomes a community until it is wrapped in human memory: family stories, tribal traditions, civic commemorations. No place is a community until it has awareness of its history. Our connections and commitment to one another are strengthened when we share stories and experiences. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT » History is a [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 October 16th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , |

The 2015 MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES Pau Hana Event, November 13, 2015

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation annually names Hawai‘i’s Most Endangered Historic Places in cooperation with HONOLULU Magazine & the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division. More than 70 gathered with Historic Hawaii Foundation & The Howard Hughes Corporation for a Pau Hana event to learn more about the 2015 Most Endangered Historic Sites and how they can be saved! This year's Pau Hana Event was held on Friday, November 13, 2015 At the iconic IBM Building's Courtyard Located at 1240 Ala Moana Blvd  Tickets are $10 From 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. The event ncluded light refreshments and updates on Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places.  Click here to learn more about Most Endangered sites from 2015 and past years.

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 October 6th, 2015|Categories: Events - Past|Tags: , , , |

Pau Hana with a Purpose: Movie Night – “Visual Acoustics–The Modernism of Julius Shulman”

Architectural photographer Julius Shulman in turn mesmerized, amused and amazed in Eric Bricker's 2008 award-winning film, "Visual Acoustics". More than 50 gathered at Design Within Reach's mod studio to unwind, socialize & watch the film narration of Shulman's life story. Mahalo nui loa to Jeff & David of DWR,our gracious hosts! _______ Join Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and Design Within Reach for a special screening of "Visual Acoustics: The Modernism of Julius Shulman". The free event will be held on Thursday, October 15 at the DWR Studio at Ala Moana Center.  The event opens at 6:00 p.m. A film short followed by the 84-minute film will be shown at 6:30 p.m.  Light refreshments will be served. Narrated by Dustin Hoffman, "Visual Acoustics" celebrates the life and career of Julius Shulman (1910-2009), widely regarded by experts as the world’s greatest architectural photographer, whose images brought modern architecture to the American mainstream. Shulman, who passed away in 2009, captured the work of nearly every modern and progressive architect since the 1930s including Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, John Lautner and Frank Gehry.  His images epitomized the singular beauty of Southern California’s modernist movement and brought its iconic structures to the attention of the general public. This unique film is both a testament to the evolution of modern architecture and a joyful portrait of the magnetic, whip-smart gentleman who chronicled it with his unforgettable images. "Visual Acoustics" won the Mercedes-Benz Audience Award for Best Documentary at Palm Springs International Film Festival, Audience Award for Best Documentary at Austin Film Festival, Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at Lone Star International Film Festival, and Outstanding Achievement in Documentary Filmmaking at Newport Beach Film Festival. Light refreshments will be served.     Reservations are [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 September 14th, 2015|Categories: Events - Past|Tags: , , , |

The Buddes’ Historic Home: From Bank to Bedrooms

By Christine Thomas    It rests on a typical dead-end street, painted a TK color. Occasionally James Budde mows the front lawn of his 1940s-era home, purchased in 1995, and Madeleine nurtures an orchid collection in the back. It’s an oasis away from Kailua’s now-bustling town center, where President Obama vacations and many tourists now flock. But its story began well before the Buddes moved in—back when soldiers from nearby Fort Hase (now Marine Corps Base Hawaii) stopped here to withdraw and deposit money. The Budde’s home was built not as a residence, but as a bank situated right along what was once the main road to the base. But come the 1960’s, when Kailua had developed into a robust residential town and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii built a new road into the base, the bank closed. The structure remained and became a personal residence, and the street grew quiet and forgotten. The Buddes wanted to find out how. Uncovering the Past The Buddes never changed the integrity of their home’s structure--they didn’t even consider it—even though their kitchen  once housed a bank vault. “The house just speaks for itself,” says Madeleine. But in 2014, Madeleine realized the house could potentially qualify as a historic home. She turned to the Historic Hawaii Foundation for help determining their home’s eligibility for the State Register of Historic Places and potential property tax reduction status. “They had so much knowledge about everything,” says Madeleine. “The staff at Historic Hawaii Foundation came in and connected us with Dr. Don Hibbard, who was so easy to work with.” When Hibbard, an architectural historian and educator, looked at the house he confirmed its historic status and lead the process to present [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:16+00:00 September 10th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , |

Historic Places Matter: A Secret Treasure in Our Midst

by Joy Davidson, Preservation Architect and Historic Hawaii Foundation Board Member While walking the dogs a few evenings ago, I stumbled across a narrow lane sandwiched between the numbered streets of Kaimuki.  Turning onto it, the slender road with no sidewalks lead me back in time, to a grouping of ten or so 1930s cottages gathered together like a secret committee.  Each pristine pastel home had a tiny manicured lawn, welcoming porch, a double pitched roof and an individual personality that can only come from standing in one spot for eighty years. I slowed to a stroll as we traveled through this 1930s enclave which seemed to have its own sounds, smells and feeling of warmth and safety.  I savored it as long as I could,   smiling and nodding at each house, mentally congratulating their owners for their meticulous care. Then, before I was ready, the tiny road ended and I popped out onto the regular street – back into 2015 – with the noisy mopeds, paved yards and concrete big-box-houses. The take-away?  It may not seem like a big deal, if one old house down the street gets demolished or another lot gets subdivided, but the tear-down trend is killing the once-charming Kaimuki neighborhoods.  There are only a few intact, and these priceless neighborhoods matter.

2017-04-21T01:01:16+00:00 August 26th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , |

Rare Gems Can Be Found in the HHF Library

The Historic Hawaii Foundation Library - Catalog Project by John Williams,  retired architect, HHF volunteer & member since 2013 August 26, 2015 Last year I had the pleasure of cataloging HHF’s library of about 500 books, which has been assembled over the last 40 years. Most of the books are about Hawaii’s history, culture, and people’s stories, in addition to general interest history and preservation topics. The majority have been donated, with many coming directly from publishers. Some of the books I’ve found to be most interesting were ones that have been written by authors and organizations, and then were self-published, because they weren’t going to have a large enough market for traditional publishers. A couple of my favorite examples were: Victoria Ward and Her Family – Memories of Old Plantation, by Frank Ward Hustace III The Japanese in Hawaii: A Century of Struggle, by Roland Kotani, and The Oahu Kanyaku Imin Centennial Committee Lihue Mill – One Hundred Fifty &Years of Sugar Processing Along Nawiliwili Stream: Grinding Cane & Building Community, by Jan Tenbruggencate Oahu Cemetery – Burial Ground & Historic Site, by Nanette Napoleon Purnell and the Oahu Cemetery Association These are just a few of the many unique explorations of Hawaii’s history to be found in the HHF Library. Access to the library is an HHF membership benefit.  Members (and prospective new members) may phone the office at 808-523-2900 to schedule a time to visit.  Books may be reviewed on the premises only.

2017-04-21T01:01:16+00:00 August 26th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

History and Art Merge at Maui’s Historic Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center

PRESERVATION IN THE NEWS:  Magical Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center offers guided walking tours of the 25 acre historic Kaluanui Estate rife with history, botanical gardens and art studios. Maui estate celebrates visual arts and history By Cheryl Chee Tsutsumi Honolulu Star Advertiser   August 2, 2015 COURTESY MIEKO PHOTOGRAPHY Artist Stephen Fellerman instructs students in a glass-blowing class. Classes are held in the studios, and artists often can be found working there. Visitors, both on the guided and self-guided tours, are welcome to take a quick peek at what’s going on in the studios. Potter's wheels spin; paintbrushes sweep across canvases; beads, shells and wire turn into pretty rings and bracelets. On any given day, creativity blooms at Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center. Art and history go hand in hand on these 25 Upcountry acres overlooking the West Maui Mountains and the verdant north shore. East Maui Plantation opened on the site in 1850. When it closed in 1885, entrepreneur Henry Baldwin bought the property. Three decades later his son and daughter-in-law, Harry and Ethel Baldwin, retained famed architect C.W. Dickey to design a home for them there. The elegant two-story mansion was completed in 1917; its name, Kaluanui, means "big pit," referring to nearby Maliko Gulch. HUI NOEAU VISUAL ARTS CENTER Built in 1917, Kaluanui, Harry and Ethel Baldwin’s estate, is now the home of Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center. Ethel Baldwin founded the hui in 1934. Ethel and her daughter, Frances Baldwin Cameron, were patrons of the arts, and in 1934 they formed Hui Noeau ("coming together for the development of artistic skill"), a group of 20 women who initially met at Kaluanui to pursue their shared passion for [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:16+00:00 August 19th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |