#Historic

Storybook Theatre on Kauai Exudes Historic Charm

Preservation in the News:  Storybook Theatre in Hanapepe, Kauai, is operated out of a renovated a nationally registered historic site ravaged by Hurricane Iniki in 1992– the Sun Ke Heong/Obatake Building. It has become a centerpiece of ongoing neighborhood revitalization and an exemplary model of a community facility serving young people and their families. www.storybook.org Storybook theatre honors Isles' purveyor of peace By Cheryl Chee Tsutsumi POSTED: 1:30 a.m. HST, Oct 11, 2015 PHOTO COURTESY ROBERT ZELKOVSKY The Storybook Theatre’s television set, site of many performances. For 36 years the Storybook Theatre of Hawaii has proved that the best stories not only entertain, but also open minds, set moral standards, prove the power of creative thinking and inspire listeners to reach for the stars. The theater has its own wonderful story to tell. It begins with Mark Jeffers, a native of Grand Rapids, Mich., who earned a master's degree in education with an early childhood focus from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1978. The following year, he co-founded the Storybook Theatre of Hawaii with Anna Viggiano, a UH graduate student in theatre. "We thought presenting good stories to children -- stories with messages about core values and how to contribute to communities in positive ways -- was a great pursuit," said Jeffers, who has been the theater's executive director since its inception. "Along with other education and theater graduates, we wrote and performed plays for schools throughout Hawaii. All the productions shared important lessons about, for example, kindness, honesty and humility." Viggiano left Storybook Theatre after a few years, and Jeffers incorporated it as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 1987, two years before he moved to Kauai. From 1990 to 1995, [...]

November 9th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , |

ANNOUNCING Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2016!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 79 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2016 sites are: Ala Kahakai Mauka to Makai Trails Ninole Stream Bridge Kaniakapupu Ruins Loko Ea Piliaama Stone Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.  

November 8th, 2016|Categories: Blog, Featured A|Tags: , , , , |

Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2015!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 74 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2015 sites are: Līhu‘e Shell Station, Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i Omega Station/Haiku Stairs, Haiku Valley, O‘ahu Kanewai Spring Complex, Kuli‘ou‘ou, O‘ahu Star of the Sea Church, Kaimu, Hawai‘i Island Ierusalema Hou Church, Hālawa Valley, Moloka‘i Quonset Huts at Pohauloa Training Area, Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA), Hawai‘i Island Kapuāiwa Coconut Grove, Hoolehua, Moloka‘i Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.      

November 4th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Historic Places Matter: A Secret Treasure in Our Midst

by Joy Davidson, Preservation Architect and Historic Hawaii Foundation Board Member While walking the dogs a few evenings ago, I stumbled across a narrow lane sandwiched between the numbered streets of Kaimuki.  Turning onto it, the slender road with no sidewalks lead me back in time, to a grouping of ten or so 1930s cottages gathered together like a secret committee.  Each pristine pastel home had a tiny manicured lawn, welcoming porch, a double pitched roof and an individual personality that can only come from standing in one spot for eighty years. I slowed to a stroll as we traveled through this 1930s enclave which seemed to have its own sounds, smells and feeling of warmth and safety.  I savored it as long as I could,   smiling and nodding at each house, mentally congratulating their owners for their meticulous care. Then, before I was ready, the tiny road ended and I popped out onto the regular street – back into 2015 – with the noisy mopeds, paved yards and concrete big-box-houses. The take-away?  It may not seem like a big deal, if one old house down the street gets demolished or another lot gets subdivided, but the tear-down trend is killing the once-charming Kaimuki neighborhoods.  There are only a few intact, and these priceless neighborhoods matter.

August 26th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , |

Rare Gems Can Be Found in the HHF Library

The Historic Hawaii Foundation Library - Catalog Project by John Williams,  retired architect, HHF volunteer & member since 2013 August 26, 2015 Last year I had the pleasure of cataloging HHF’s library of about 500 books, which has been assembled over the last 40 years. Most of the books are about Hawaii’s history, culture, and people’s stories, in addition to general interest history and preservation topics. The majority have been donated, with many coming directly from publishers. Some of the books I’ve found to be most interesting were ones that have been written by authors and organizations, and then were self-published, because they weren’t going to have a large enough market for traditional publishers. A couple of my favorite examples were: Victoria Ward and Her Family – Memories of Old Plantation, by Frank Ward Hustace III The Japanese in Hawaii: A Century of Struggle, by Roland Kotani, and The Oahu Kanyaku Imin Centennial Committee Lihue Mill – One Hundred Fifty &Years of Sugar Processing Along Nawiliwili Stream: Grinding Cane & Building Community, by Jan Tenbruggencate Oahu Cemetery – Burial Ground & Historic Site, by Nanette Napoleon Purnell and the Oahu Cemetery Association These are just a few of the many unique explorations of Hawaii’s history to be found in the HHF Library. Access to the library is an HHF membership benefit.  Members (and prospective new members) may phone the office at 808-523-2900 to schedule a time to visit.  Books may be reviewed on the premises only.

August 26th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

History and Art Merge at Maui’s Historic Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center

PRESERVATION IN THE NEWS:  Magical Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center offers guided walking tours of the 25 acre historic Kaluanui Estate rife with history, botanical gardens and art studios. Maui estate celebrates visual arts and history By Cheryl Chee Tsutsumi Honolulu Star Advertiser   August 2, 2015 COURTESY MIEKO PHOTOGRAPHY Artist Stephen Fellerman instructs students in a glass-blowing class. Classes are held in the studios, and artists often can be found working there. Visitors, both on the guided and self-guided tours, are welcome to take a quick peek at what’s going on in the studios. Potter's wheels spin; paintbrushes sweep across canvases; beads, shells and wire turn into pretty rings and bracelets. On any given day, creativity blooms at Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center. Art and history go hand in hand on these 25 Upcountry acres overlooking the West Maui Mountains and the verdant north shore. East Maui Plantation opened on the site in 1850. When it closed in 1885, entrepreneur Henry Baldwin bought the property. Three decades later his son and daughter-in-law, Harry and Ethel Baldwin, retained famed architect C.W. Dickey to design a home for them there. The elegant two-story mansion was completed in 1917; its name, Kaluanui, means "big pit," referring to nearby Maliko Gulch. HUI NOEAU VISUAL ARTS CENTER Built in 1917, Kaluanui, Harry and Ethel Baldwin’s estate, is now the home of Hui Noeau Visual Arts Center. Ethel Baldwin founded the hui in 1934. Ethel and her daughter, Frances Baldwin Cameron, were patrons of the arts, and in 1934 they formed Hui Noeau ("coming together for the development of artistic skill"), a group of 20 women who initially met at Kaluanui to pursue their shared passion for [...]

August 19th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

Preserving the Kona Way of Life

Living History in Kona by Christine Thomas At its root, Kona remains a committed farming and ranching community. While the coast may be dotted with visitors and resorts, the mauka region is dedicated to growing crops,raising cattle and working the land. Housed in the old H. N. Greenwell general store in Kealakekua, the Kona Historical Society (KHS) upholds the mission of preserving Kona’s past to share it with future generations. It manages a robust Kona-centered archive and two historic sites--the Greenwell Store and adjacent Uchida Coffee farm, both run as living history museums. When KHS acquired the 7-acre coffee farm that had been run by the Uchida family for three generations in 1996, preservation was the goal. KHS decided to not only preserve the coffee mill, but the entire farm as a second living history museum to showcase the way of life of generations of Kona residents. Historic Hawaii Foundation (HHF) helped KHS find consultants and conservators to help bring the farm back into working order, restore the orchards and 100-year-old trees, and create an unforgettable experience that brings visitors back to the 1920‘s-1940‘s era of the farm during the coffee heyday. The property was painstakingly repaired to ensure historical accuracy, and today even includes chickens and a donkey, which would once have been used to pack and deliver bags of coffee. HHF continues to help celebrate and acknowledge volunteers and community members who actively preserve the Kona way of life, the way generations of Kona residents were raised. Farms provided a lasting foundation and ethic of hard work that can be seen in such pioneering families as the Uchidas. What was a way of life then, for many Kona residents, still is.   Fast [...]

August 12th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , |

Hawaii Tourism Conference to Feature Heritage Tourism Mobile Workshops

Two mobile workshops at this year's Hawaii Tourism Conference will provide an opportunity for members of the tourism industry to learn more about heritage tourism and how historic sites and attractions can be incorporated into visitors' island experience. Today's travelers are constantly in search of new experiences, and Hawaii's unique culture and heritage offers some of the best opportunities to attract and engage with both visitors and residents. For the first time, HTA is partnering with the Historic Hawaii Foundation to offer Heritage Tourism Mobile Workshops at historic sites on Oahu. Participants will learn about each area's cultural significance, impact and opportunities for incorporating and supporting these sites and experiences into offerings for visitors and residents. WHAT: 2015 Hawaii Tourism Conference  WHY: The Hawaii Tourism Authority, the state's tourism agency, will hold its annual Hawaii Tourism Conference. The two-day conference is Hawaii's premier tourism stakeholder event featuring local, national and international leading experts in their fields sharing insight on tourism issues and trends unique to Hawaii's visitor industry. The Conference is attended by all stakeholders of the Hawaii travel and tourism industry including hotels and resorts, bed & breakfasts, timeshares, restaurants, festivals & events, retail stores, attractions, cultural organizations, restaurants, community leaders, and other related organizations and businesses working together to attain the State’s vision for a Hawaii that is the best place to live, work and visit.  For the conference schedule and additional information on the Hawaii Tourism Conference, click here. WHEN:  August 27-28, 2015 WHERE: Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu 1801 Kalakaua Avenue Honolulu, Hawai‘i REGISTRATION IS OPEN: Registration fees include conference sessions, breakfasts, Tourism Legacy Awards luncheon and a pau hana reception. Early bird rates are available through Aug. 3 at $195 per person or $185 per person [...]

July 31st, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Disappearing Lanai – A Pictorial Essay

Preservation in the News: This stunning pictorial and historical account of Lanai will leave you breathless. Disappearing Lanai by: Derek Paiva, Photography by Grant Kaye | Hawaii Magazine - Jun 25, 2015 Lanai has always been the definition of home for Grant Kaye. Of his 36 years, the Oahu-born photographer has been a full time resident of the island for only four—from the days following his birth up until his parents, Robin and Sally, moved the family to Pennsylvania just as Kaye was about to begin school. Now living near Lake Tahoe, Kaye returns several times annually to visit his parents who, a decade ago, finally moved back to retire in the home they long ago bought, moved away from, but always kept on Lanai. Ultimately assuring Kaye could call nowhere else in the world home, however, were the summer vacations he’d spend on Lanai from grade school through his high school graduation—times spent reconnecting with friends, his extended hanai ohana (adopted family) and the island itself. On Lanai, the Pennsylvania kid would revel in days and nights spent spearfishing, camping, beaching and exploring with his summer buddies. Guided and educated by family friend “Uncle” Albert Morita, a game warden who was raised on Lanai, Kaye found the little-populated, largely undeveloped 140-square-mile island an undiscovered country ripe for exploration. “Every trip back, my dad and I would spend as much time as we could with Uncle Albert, who would always want to take us to somewhere that we’d never been before,” remembers Kaye. “His family had lived on [Lanai] forever and he had such a deep love for the island and still does. We’d go to see petroglyphs or a heiau, always someplace different.” Those summers [...]

July 23rd, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

Community Workshop Scheduled to Revisit Vision for Pearl Harbor Historic Trail

Preservation in the News:  Imagine an 18-mile shoreline trail from Aiea to Nanakuli incorporating historic sites, recreation areas and various other related attractions?  Come to the community meeting and workshop at Aiea Elementary School on Wednesday, July 22 to discuss and help form the vision. Pearl Harbor Historic Trail meeting set By Jayna Omaye, Honolulu Star Advertiser Jul 16, 2015 The vision of the Pearl Harbor Historic Trail took root nearly 15 years ago when Aiea and Pearl City residents helped to compile a master plan for a trail along the shoreline to Nanakuli from Aiea that would host, among other things, improved bicycle and pedestrian paths, boat tours and a cultural learning center. City officials are now making efforts to relaunch the project that seeks to drive economic development and establish historic preservation plans on an 18-mile trail linking neighborhoods to various attractions, historic sites and recreation areas along the old Oahu Railway & Land Co. corridor. The master plan, developed in 2001 through community input and adopted by the City Council in 2003, serves as the basis for the revitalization of the shoreline that currently features a city-run bike path from Pearl Harbor to Waipahu and Ewa Beach, with the hope of extending it into Nanakuli. A long-term goal was to operate a steam train along the entire historic railway by extending a route that the Hawaiian Railway Society currently operates from Ewa Beach to Kahe Point. In 2005, then-Gov. Linda Lingle signed a bill that officially recognized the path from Halawa Landing near the USS Arizona Visitors Center through Waipahu as the Pearl Harbor Historic Trail, which was seen by proponents as a breakthrough in moving forward with the master plan. Officials [...]

July 20th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |