Hawaii

Ala Kahakai Mauka to Makai Trails (2016)

Photos: Courtesy of State Historic Preservation Division Article Written By: Katrina Valcourt, HONOLULU Magazine What is it? Ancient Hawaiians used a system of trails called ala loa to travel between ahupuaa in precontact Hawaii. Over time, many evolved from footpaths tp our modern highways, but the routes remain. One of the best preserved examples is a 175-mile trail on the Big Island called the Ala Kahakai. Portions of it are on the National Register of Historic Places, however, there are many other "in-between" trails that are not, especially connecting trails running mauka to makai. What threatens it? All ancient trails are threatened by forces of nature (suck as lava flows or landslides), neglect or development. It's especially hard to preserve the trails that have not been identified as part of the ancient system; however, when they are identified, the State Historic Preservation Division takes measures to protect and preserve them, according to administrator Alan Downer. "The difficulty is that we are often working with fragmentary information. So we may have bits of trail segments identified in a report but nothing to put them in context of a system of trails," he says. "In such instances, it is difficult to make really effective management decisions because we don't have the information we need to make better ones." According to Aric Arakaki, superintendent of the Ala Kahakai with the National Park Service, "Everything is voluntary on the part of the land owners and the public to preserve it." He says that about50 percent of the trail runs through private property. "Any place that you see development coming up, we're kind of worried." What can be done? Arakaki says, "Trails that fall outside of our corridor, if they [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:12+00:00 November 17th, 2016|Categories: MES Hawaii|Tags: , |

Ninole Stream Bridge (2016)

Article Written By: Katrina Valcourt, HONOLULU Magazine What is it? THis is one of the last remaining timber bridges in the Hawaii state highway system, according to the State Historic Preservation Division's files. Built in 1940 by engineer William R. Bartels, the 60-foot historic bridge carries Mamalahoa Highway over Ninole Strea. Though 76 years ole, its wooden columns and railings remain structurally sound, but it's not wide enough for modern transportation needs and does not match other bridges in the system. What threatens it? THe Federal Highway Administration's Federal Lands Highway Division and the state Department of Transportation have proposed a replacement bridge that would be able to accommodate larger vehicles and be safer. The project overview states that, as of Setp. 1 the final Environmental Assessment is being prepared, maps are being reviewed and the project is almost 100-percent designed. Funding, however, hasn't been acquired yet. What can be done? Because the bridge is eligible for the Hawaii Register of Historic Places, someone can nominate it to the state register without having to get the Department of Transportation's permission (this is not the case for sites nominated to the national register). Being listed on the register wouldn't guarantee its protection, but the State Historic Preservation Division would have to review the demolition first and could ask for other proposals to be considered. The current proposal calls for a temporary bridge to be constructed next to the current one whole the new bridge is being built. If the temporary bridge were built as the permanent replacement, the original bridge could remain for pedestrians and bicyclists.

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 November 17th, 2016|Categories: MES Hawaii|Tags: , |

ANNOUNCING Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2016!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 79 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2016 sites are: Ala Kahakai Mauka to Makai Trails Ninole Stream Bridge Kaniakapupu Ruins Loko Ea Piliaama Stone Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.  

2017-06-07T15:16:17+00:00 November 8th, 2016|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Hawai‘i’s MOST ENDANGERED Historic Places of 2015!

What are Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places and why do they matter? The Most Endangered Historic Places is a public awareness campaign that seeks to remind people of historical sites that are often overlooked or forgotten. Sharing their connection to real people and events from the past that are still relevant today serves as a rallying cry for citizen action to protect these community landmarks. The annual list serves to highlight some of the best opportunities for preservation each year because the historic sites are threatened in some way, but still have opportunities for survival and reuse. Seven sites have been added this year with a total of 74 historic sites listed since 2005. The 2015 sites are: Līhu‘e Shell Station, Līhu‘e, Kaua‘i Omega Station/Haiku Stairs, Haiku Valley, O‘ahu Kanewai Spring Complex, Kuli‘ou‘ou, O‘ahu Star of the Sea Church, Kaimu, Hawai‘i Island Ierusalema Hou Church, Hālawa Valley, Moloka‘i Quonset Huts at Pohauloa Training Area, Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA), Hawai‘i Island Kapuāiwa Coconut Grove, Hoolehua, Moloka‘i Read more about each site, why it’s relevant and what threatens it by clicking on each (above). Click here to read the full article by Katrina Valcourt in HONOLULU Magazine. The list of threatened historic properties is an annual program of Historic Hawai‘i Foundation, in partnership with the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division and HONOLULU Magazine.      

2017-04-21T01:01:12+00:00 November 4th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |

Pohakuloa Training Area Quonset Huts (2015)

Photography: Courtesy of USAG-HI Directorate of Public Works Article Written By: Loren Moreno, HONOLULU Magazine What is it? Quonset huts were designed during World War II as easy-to-assemble, temporary buildings that could be broken down and reassembled quickly. Many of the more than 100 huts at the Pōhakuloa Training Area were constructed during the 1950s and reportedly contain the only Quonset-hut chapel in the Army. The state says they make up one of the last remaining groups of huts still in use in the U.S., and it’s probable their materials were used on other military bases prior to coming to Pōhakuloa. What threatens it? The Army is looking into demolishing the huts, which are corroded and no longer meet Pōhakuloa’s requirements. “From an engineering perspective, we don’t believe they’re repairable,” says Sally Pfenning, director of Public Works for the U.S. Army Garrison Hawai‘i. “They were never meant to be permanent.” The huts may qualify for listing on the National Register of Historic Places because the type of structure is associated with World War II, but, in that case, only a few huts would need to be preserved. What can be done? Pfenning says the Army is currently going through the legal process with the state Historic Preservation Division, Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and other partners to see if the huts are eligible for the register. Within the next six months there will be a public comment period for the proposed changes. However, most of the huts were used as Cold War-era housing; a loophole in the National Historic Preservation Act requires the Army must take comments into consideration, but is not obligated to formally resolve them. To preserve the huts, some alternatives to demolition may be: Move them to another area, reevaluate the treatment of Cold War-era housing review or reevaluate to which era the huts truly belong.

2016-11-17T10:47:36+00:00 November 1st, 2015|Categories: MES Hawaii|Tags: , |

Star of the Sea Church (2015)

Article Written By: Katrina Valcourt, HONOLULU Magazine What is it? The Kalapana painted church isn’t in Kalapana anymore. That’s because, when lava was about to take the town in 1990, the church parishioners decided to move the building to safety. (Good thing they did, since lava covered the highway just hours later.) In 1996, the church moved again to its current location along Highway 130; it was added to the National Register of Historic Places shortly thereafter. The building is one of only two remaining painted churches by Father Evarist Gielen, who built it in 1930 and painted the ceiling with religious scenes. Other artists have since added their work, covering the walls as well. What threatens it? The paintings are peeling, and someone threw a rock through a stained-glass window. Roseanna Kanoa, owner of Big Island Processing across the street, says people go there and abuse the building, so they’ve had to lock some of its windows. Previously, the Kalapana ‘Ohana Association helped maintain the church, but the group is no longer active, leaving Kanoa and two other volunteers to care for it. “We try to raise funds, but everything goes to overhead, electric, porta-potty, water, general liability and fire insurance, the lease and property tax,” she says. What can be done? The paintings need to be restored by a specialized craftsman, but donations from tourists who pick up religious trinkets are minimal and go toward basic costs and repairs. Right now, Kanoa’s goal is to finish painting the outside of the church. “People always say they’ll help, but they never come through.... I really don’t know what’s going to happen.” She says if someone were to find a painter and put up the money, it could be restored, but nobody has time to even fundraise. She says the state is too overwhelmed to take it on, even though it’s on [...]

2016-11-17T10:47:47+00:00 November 1st, 2015|Categories: MES Hawaii|Tags: , |

The 2015 MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES Pau Hana Event, November 13, 2015

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation annually names Hawai‘i’s Most Endangered Historic Places in cooperation with HONOLULU Magazine & the Hawai‘i State Historic Preservation Division. More than 70 gathered with Historic Hawaii Foundation & The Howard Hughes Corporation for a Pau Hana event to learn more about the 2015 Most Endangered Historic Sites and how they can be saved! This year's Pau Hana Event was held on Friday, November 13, 2015 At the iconic IBM Building's Courtyard Located at 1240 Ala Moana Blvd  Tickets are $10 From 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. The event ncluded light refreshments and updates on Hawaii's Most Endangered Historic Places.  Click here to learn more about Most Endangered sites from 2015 and past years.

2017-04-21T01:01:15+00:00 October 6th, 2015|Categories: Events - Past|Tags: , , , |

Rare Gems Can Be Found in the HHF Library

The Historic Hawaii Foundation Library - Catalog Project by John Williams,  retired architect, HHF volunteer & member since 2013 August 26, 2015 Last year I had the pleasure of cataloging HHF’s library of about 500 books, which has been assembled over the last 40 years. Most of the books are about Hawaii’s history, culture, and people’s stories, in addition to general interest history and preservation topics. The majority have been donated, with many coming directly from publishers. Some of the books I’ve found to be most interesting were ones that have been written by authors and organizations, and then were self-published, because they weren’t going to have a large enough market for traditional publishers. A couple of my favorite examples were: Victoria Ward and Her Family – Memories of Old Plantation, by Frank Ward Hustace III The Japanese in Hawaii: A Century of Struggle, by Roland Kotani, and The Oahu Kanyaku Imin Centennial Committee Lihue Mill – One Hundred Fifty &Years of Sugar Processing Along Nawiliwili Stream: Grinding Cane & Building Community, by Jan Tenbruggencate Oahu Cemetery – Burial Ground & Historic Site, by Nanette Napoleon Purnell and the Oahu Cemetery Association These are just a few of the many unique explorations of Hawaii’s history to be found in the HHF Library. Access to the library is an HHF membership benefit.  Members (and prospective new members) may phone the office at 808-523-2900 to schedule a time to visit.  Books may be reviewed on the premises only.

2017-04-21T01:01:16+00:00 August 26th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

Preserving the Kona Way of Life

Living History in Kona by Christine Thomas At its root, Kona remains a committed farming and ranching community. While the coast may be dotted with visitors and resorts, the mauka region is dedicated to growing crops,raising cattle and working the land. Housed in the old H. N. Greenwell general store in Kealakekua, the Kona Historical Society (KHS) upholds the mission of preserving Kona’s past to share it with future generations. It manages a robust Kona-centered archive and two historic sites--the Greenwell Store and adjacent Uchida Coffee farm, both run as living history museums. When KHS acquired the 7-acre coffee farm that had been run by the Uchida family for three generations in 1996, preservation was the goal. KHS decided to not only preserve the coffee mill, but the entire farm as a second living history museum to showcase the way of life of generations of Kona residents. Historic Hawaii Foundation (HHF) helped KHS find consultants and conservators to help bring the farm back into working order, restore the orchards and 100-year-old trees, and create an unforgettable experience that brings visitors back to the 1920‘s-1940‘s era of the farm during the coffee heyday. The property was painstakingly repaired to ensure historical accuracy, and today even includes chickens and a donkey, which would once have been used to pack and deliver bags of coffee. HHF continues to help celebrate and acknowledge volunteers and community members who actively preserve the Kona way of life, the way generations of Kona residents were raised. Farms provided a lasting foundation and ethic of hard work that can be seen in such pioneering families as the Uchidas. What was a way of life then, for many Kona residents, still is.   Fast [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:17+00:00 August 12th, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , |

Hawaii Tourism Conference to Feature Heritage Tourism Mobile Workshops

Two mobile workshops at this year's Hawaii Tourism Conference will provide an opportunity for members of the tourism industry to learn more about heritage tourism and how historic sites and attractions can be incorporated into visitors' island experience. Today's travelers are constantly in search of new experiences, and Hawaii's unique culture and heritage offers some of the best opportunities to attract and engage with both visitors and residents. For the first time, HTA is partnering with the Historic Hawaii Foundation to offer Heritage Tourism Mobile Workshops at historic sites on Oahu. Participants will learn about each area's cultural significance, impact and opportunities for incorporating and supporting these sites and experiences into offerings for visitors and residents. WHAT: 2015 Hawaii Tourism Conference  WHY: The Hawaii Tourism Authority, the state's tourism agency, will hold its annual Hawaii Tourism Conference. The two-day conference is Hawaii's premier tourism stakeholder event featuring local, national and international leading experts in their fields sharing insight on tourism issues and trends unique to Hawaii's visitor industry. The Conference is attended by all stakeholders of the Hawaii travel and tourism industry including hotels and resorts, bed & breakfasts, timeshares, restaurants, festivals & events, retail stores, attractions, cultural organizations, restaurants, community leaders, and other related organizations and businesses working together to attain the State’s vision for a Hawaii that is the best place to live, work and visit.  For the conference schedule and additional information on the Hawaii Tourism Conference, click here. WHEN:  August 27-28, 2015 WHERE: Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu 1801 Kalakaua Avenue Honolulu, Hawai‘i REGISTRATION IS OPEN: Registration fees include conference sessions, breakfasts, Tourism Legacy Awards luncheon and a pau hana reception. Early bird rates are available through Aug. 3 at $195 per person or $185 per person [...]

2017-04-21T01:01:17+00:00 July 31st, 2015|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , |