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Tools for Saving Places: Historic Preservation Seminars this August on Kauai, Maui, Hawaii Island & Oahu

  Join Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and National Park Service for a free seminar that will provide training on the tools and techniques available for community members to save historic places. The full day seminars will help the public identify opportunities and rights to participate in historic preservation regulatory processes and share other means and tools for effective advocacy to save and preserve historic properties and cultural sites. Presentation Download Download the full slide deck here. See additional materials for download below. Download Download Reference Materials Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and the National Park Service presented a seminar in August 2017 on “Tools for Saving Places.”  Reference documents and additional resources from the seminar may be downloaded here. Download ATTENDEES WILL LEARN: Definitions and purpose of historic preservation. Definitions and criteria used to identify historic properties. Which major Federal, State and Local laws and ordinances address historic preservation. Opportunities, rights and responsibilities for public participation in the preservation processes. Additional methods, activities and practices to achieve preservation outcomes. Presenters: Kiersten Faulkner, Executive Director, Historic Hawaii Foundation; guest presenters, Elaine  Jackson-Retondo, National Park Service and Stanton Enomoto, Department of the Interior. Dr. Elaine Jackson-Retondo, Pacific West History Program Manager in the National Park Service Pacific West Regional Office, earned her Doctorate in Architectural History and Masters of Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley and her Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. She has worked in the National Park Service since 2002. Jackson-Retondo’s current and past work has included the National Park Service’s American Latino Heritage Initiative, Asian American Pacific Islander Initiative, Japanese American confinement during [...]

2017-08-16T19:41:45+00:00 April 28th, 2017|Categories: Events - Past|

Preservation Awards Spotlight: Ewa Community Church

Project Spotlight  Ewa Community Church, 91-1258 Renton Road, Ewa Beach Built: 1926 Designed by: Herbert Cohen Cayton Architecture style: Gothic Revival Preservation Award Honoree, 2017 Ewa Community Church is tucked away next to the Ewa Elementary School located in the ever-expanding neighborhood of Ewa. The building has a typical cruciform layout with an entrance on the side of the nave, instead of at the end opposite the altar.  The only exterior embellishments are the stained glass in Gothic-arched windows.  The church was originally built to service the Ewa Plantation workers residing in the village and was redone in 1937 keeping only the original framework. The church is a vital part of the local community and is currently home to the United Church of Christ congregation.  The restoration of the church began as a stained glass window repair project which, once underway, grew to include a condition assessment to establish interior and exterior maintenance and repair priorities, structural repair requirements and plans to improve accessibility and campus-wide electrical service. The bulk of the project was completed in 2016 with restoration work on the aging building supported by a preservation grant through the Freeman Foundation’s partnership with Historic Hawai‘i Foundation. The project thoughtfully restored the church which is an integral part of the Ewa Historic Sugar Plantation Historic District. The church continues today in its important role as a religious and community gathering place. The success in preserving this historical church is a positive example of the possibilities for other plantation village buildings and dwellings in disrepair in the surrounding neighborhood. Ewa Community Church will be recognized with a Preservation Award at the 2017 Honor Awards Ceremony & Celebration on May 19. Also honored will be project contributors Mason Architects, Robert Marcos, Inc. and James [...]

2017-05-30T14:00:09+00:00 April 28th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Curtis and Victoria Ward’s Legacy

The Wards, Old Plantation, and New Ward Village By Kristen Pedersen  Imagine owning all the property between Thomas Square on King Street down to the ocean, including most of eastern Kaka’ako. Now envision the property, not as part of urban Honolulu, but as a green and productive plantation, as it was in the 1880’s. This vision was real and it began in 1870 when Curtis and Victoria Ward purchased this exact 100 acres of land. Over the next several years, the Wards established a self-sufficient farm and built a beautiful Southern-style house, called Old Plantation. The house was located on the mauka side of the property, and included an artesian well, a large fishpond, vegetable and flower gardens, more than 7000 coconut trees, and extensive pastures dedicated to raising horses and cattle. Victoria Ward raised 7 daughters_Photo credit - Victoria Ward Ltd According to Frank Ward Hustace, in his book “Victoria Ward and Her Family: Memories of Old Plantation,” the fishpond was filled with amaama, mullet, and aholehole. The artesian well was fed by a spring of cool water, as clear as glass. According to Hustace, “Queen Emma loved the cool water from the Wards’ artesian well and would stop to drink out of kaio leaves folded into cups.” Unfortunately, Curtis Ward did not get to enjoy the plantation for long. Just a year after construction on the house was finished, Curtis died and Victoria took over the plantation’s commercial operations. She successfully ran the business on her own until 1930 when she and her seven daughters established Victoria Ward Ltd, which assumed daily management of the property. Victoria died in 1935. Curtis Perry Ward died at age 53_ Photo credit Victoria Ward Ltd [...]

2017-04-28T12:51:59+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

The Difference Between ‘Historic’ and ‘Beautiful’

By Tonia Moy Time and time again, you hear someone ask why anyone would want to keep an “ugly” building or a building that is dirty and clearly in need of work or such a simple, uninteresting building. I guess you could say we preservationists look at buildings through a different lens—a lens that can see the swan in the ugly duckling; the story in the simple lines; the book behind the cover. Looking past the years of dirt and neglect, it's our job as preservationists to teach people about the lessons learned from our historic resources. This is no doubt something we can always work harder on. Queen Emma Building, Downtown Honolulu Nuclear Reactor Building, University of Washington, Seattle For example, take the Queen Emma Building, aka the “pimple” building. While people may remember that building being named as one of the ugliest buildings in town in a Charles Memminger poll in 2005, the lens through which a preservationist will view the building is that it is a uniquely constructed building that had an artistically done brise soleil. While many people think the unusual way the bricks are protruding look like pimples, the story to be told is how the designer used standard concrete bricks in a very inexpensive way to form a decorative wall. The metal brise soleil provided screens on the south side, which today would garner ppoints for sustainability. It is like a Mid-Century Modern sculpture. Unfortunately, part of that sculpture, the brise soleil, was removed in 2011 in a previous concept to make a sleek glass box from the building, to make the building look like many of the contemporary buildings in town. Sometimes [...]

2017-04-26T12:15:49+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Categories: Trends & Issues|

What are the pros and cons of using substitute materials when making repairs to a historic building?

By Sharon C. Park, AIA When deteriorated, damaged, or lost features of a historic building need repair or replacement, it is almost always best to use historic materials. In limited circumstances substitute materials that imitate historic materials may be used if the appearance and properties of the historic materials can be matched closely and no damage to the remaining historic fabric will result. The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation require that: Deteriorated architectural features be repaired rather than replaced, wherever possible. In the event that replacement is necessary, the new material should match the material being replaced in composition, design, color, texture, and other visual properties. The practice of using substitute materials in architecture is not new, yet it continues to pose practical problems and to raise philosophical questions. On the practical level the inappropriate choice or improper installation of substitute materials can cause a radical change in a building's appearance and can cause extensive physical damage over time. On the more philosophical level, the wholesale use of substitute materials can raise questions concerning the integrity of historic buildings largely comprised of new materials. In both cases the integrity of the historic resource can be destroyed. In general, four circumstances warrant the consideration of substitute materials: the unavailability of historic materials; the unavailability of skilled craftsmen; inherent flaws in the original materials; and code-required changes (which in many cases can be extremely destructive of historic resources). Use of these materials should be limited, since replacement of historic materials on a large scale may jeopardize the integrity of a historic resource. Every means of repairing deteriorating historic materials or replacing them with identical materials should be examined before turning to substitute materials. Because [...]

2017-04-26T11:48:24+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Categories: Ask an Expert|

Sustaining Places: Historic Preservation Summer Series 2017

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and the Chinatown Improvement District are pleased to announce the historic preservation summer series for 2017. The 3-part series provides information about methods, techniques and resources to preserve historic commercial buildings. The seminars provide practical, specific information on maintaining and rehabilitating historic structures, helping them to continue to provide benefits to the owners, the historic district and the greater community. The series also educates policy makers about problems and concerns building owners face and potential solutions. The 2017 series will be held on the second Wednesday of the months of May, June and July from 12 – 1 p.m. at Lyon Associates, 45 No. King Street, 5th Floor. The one-hour classes are free and open to the public. May 10 Session: Qualifies for 1 AIA/CES LU. June 14 Session: Qualifies for 1 AIA/CES (HSW) LU. July 12 Session: Qualifies for 1 AIA/CES (HSW) LU. AIA Honolulu is the registered provider. The third session on Electrical Capacity & Upgrades is pending approval. Download Flier (PDF) Wednesday, MAY 10: Facades & Storefronts: Identifying & Protecting Your Building's Visual Presentation in a Cost Effective Way Presented by: Fung Associates, Inc. and Mason Architects, Inc. This session will provide an overview of historic building facades and fronts with visual examples while identifying what’s important on your building’s façade and why. The presenters will explain character defining features and note why it is important to maintain/restore them. The discussion will also include tips on how to protect/restore unique features in a cost effective way via identifying small, feasible projects and designing and implementing an action plan of step by step small preservation projects. Opportunities for funding support will also be broached. Wednesday, [...]

2017-07-14T12:51:54+00:00 April 18th, 2017|Categories: Events - Past|

The Labor Murals of Ceramicist Isami Enomoto

Our friends at Docomomo Hawaii shared a serendipitous story of how they came to be the proud caretakers of a set of five murals by renowned Hawaii artist,  Isami Enomoto. After agreeing to take the murals and not knowing who would adopt them for display, a series of "chance encounters" led them to the Center for Labor Education at West Oahu College, a perfect fit. THE PROJECT: On Oct. 31, 2015, the Bank of Hawaii, closed its Kapahulu branch and sold the building, which was home to a set of five 1961 murals by acclaimed Hawai‘i artist Isami Enomoto depicting labor in the islands. The bank did not want to keep the murals, and when none of the state’s established art institutions were able to accept them, Docomomo Hawai‘i assumed responsibility for the preservation of these artistically and historically important murals. The Bank of Hawaii donated the artwork, which was appraised at $50,000, to the organization. To date Docomomo Hawai`i has spent $5,000 for the moving, crating, and storage of the works, which range in size from 6'-8"x6'-6" to 11'-2"x6'-2 , with the largest piece estimated to weigh 650 pounds. Happily, Docomomo Hawai‘i has found a home for the murals at the Center for Labor Education at West Oahu College, which has agreed to publicly display them, and Docomomo is raising funds to prepare the wall, and clean, repair, move and install the them. The goal is to preserve and share this unique modern art with the people of Hawai‘i. THE ART: Rendered in a style reminiscent of Depression Era public works art projects, these five murals by Isami Enomoto depict laborers and occupations, vividly capturing an important moment in Hawai‘i's history. Commissioned by the [...]

2017-04-21T01:00:51+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Volunteer at Loko Paaiau Fishpond on Earth Day

HHF In the Field Last week, HHF staff participated in the annual Cultural Resources Management meetings with Navy Region Hawai`i and Marine Corps Base Hawai`i this week. The 4 days of meetings and site visits are held to review all preservation actions from the previous year and prepare for coordination for anticipated projects in the coming year. The meetings included an opportunity for site visits to nearby historical and cultural sites and a memorable one was the trip to Loko Paaiau fishpond which is about 400 years old. Volunteer to help clean up the fishpond on Earth Day, April 22, from 9:00 a.m. to Noon Sailors and local volunteers pick invasive mangroves out of the ground during a July 18 cleanup at the ancient fishpond, Loko Pa’aiau, at McGrew Point Navy housing on Oahu. The fishpond restoration started September 2014 and is an ongoing cultural resources project involving the Navy and the local community. U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Laurie Dexter The Navy and the Aiea Native Hawaiian Civic Club are partnering to clean up the Loko Paaiau fishpond. Volunteer for clean-up efforts this Earth Day and help remove invasive vegetation and plant native vegetation.  Other volunteer activities may include trash pick up and restoration of the makai wall and other features.     Volunteers will be briefed on the archaeological and cultural background of the fishpond, natural resources of the area and storm water issues. They'll be time for question and answers and light snacks will be provided. To volunteer, contact Jeff Pantaleo, 471-1171 X368 / jeff.pantaleo@navy.mil by April 17.  

2017-04-21T01:00:52+00:00 April 3rd, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation is pleased to present the 2017 Preservation Honor Awards

Please join us in celebrating achievements in preservation and the people who made them possible. The event will be held on Friday, May 19th at the YWCA Laniakea Fuller Hall and Courtyard. The event will include a presentation of the awards and reception to follow with heavy pūpū in the outdoor courtyard.

2017-07-14T14:39:05+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Uncategorized|

Camp Tarawa Then and Now

Camp Tarawa Today by Fred Greguras Kamuela (Waimea) is located at the intersection of the Mamalahoa Highway (Highway 190) and Kawaihae Road (Highway 19) in the northwest part of the island of Hawai’i.  In 1943, it was a small town of about 400 called Kamuela and its residents were almost totally dependent on the Parker Ranch for their livelihood. Camp Tarawa was located on Parker Ranch property in and around Kamuela from 1943-1945.  The camp was between the volcanic peaks of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. The Marines and Seabees were at four locations: the camp main side at Kamuela; the artillery camp at Pohakuloa; the amtrac camp at Hapuna Beach and the division rear at the port facilities in Hilo. Most unit headquarters, tent camps, mess halls, clubs, recreation facilities, warehouses, etc. were located at main side.  There were large outlying training areas surrounding the camps for small arms practice, an artillery range, amphibious training and other purposes.   Main Side, Camp Tarawa, 1944-45 The 2nd Marine Division was sent to Camp Tarawa in December, 1943 after the World War II battle of Tarawa to recuperate, get replacements and train for the Saipan and Tinian campaigns in the Pacific. The 2nd Marine Division named their camp after the brutal battle they had just fought to honor the Marines who died there. The division departed from Camp Tarawa in the spring, 1944. The 5th Marine Division used Camp Tarawa beginning in the fall, 1944 to train for the assault on Iwo Jima. The 5th Marine Division left the camp in late December, 1944 and returned to the camp in March 1945 after the battle of Iwo Jima to recover, get replacements and prepare [...]

2017-04-21T01:00:52+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Blog|