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So far HistoricHawaii has created 1082 blog entries.

What are the pros and cons of using substitute materials when making repairs to a historic building?

By Sharon C. Park, AIA When deteriorated, damaged, or lost features of a historic building need repair or replacement, it is almost always best to use historic materials. In limited circumstances substitute materials that imitate historic materials may be used if the appearance and properties of the historic materials can be matched closely and no damage to the remaining historic fabric will result. The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation require that: Deteriorated architectural features be repaired rather than replaced, wherever possible. In the event that replacement is necessary, the new material should match the material being replaced in composition, design, color, texture, and other visual properties. The practice of using substitute materials in architecture is not new, yet it continues to pose practical problems and to raise philosophical questions. On the practical level the inappropriate choice or improper installation of substitute materials can cause a radical change in a building's appearance and can cause extensive physical damage over time. On the more philosophical level, the wholesale use of substitute materials can raise questions concerning the integrity of historic buildings largely comprised of new materials. In both cases the integrity of the historic resource can be destroyed. In general, four circumstances warrant the consideration of substitute materials: the unavailability of historic materials; the unavailability of skilled craftsmen; inherent flaws in the original materials; and code-required changes (which in many cases can be extremely destructive of historic resources). Use of these materials should be limited, since replacement of historic materials on a large scale may jeopardize the integrity of a historic resource. Every means of repairing deteriorating historic materials or replacing them with identical materials should be examined before turning to substitute materials. Because [...]

2017-04-26T11:48:24+00:00 April 26th, 2017|Categories: Ask an Expert|

The Labor Murals of Ceramicist Isami Enomoto

Our friends at Docomomo Hawaii shared a serendipitous story of how they came to be the proud caretakers of a set of five murals by renowned Hawaii artist,  Isami Enomoto. After agreeing to take the murals and not knowing who would adopt them for display, a series of "chance encounters" led them to the Center for Labor Education at West Oahu College, a perfect fit. THE PROJECT: On Oct. 31, 2015, the Bank of Hawaii, closed its Kapahulu branch and sold the building, which was home to a set of five 1961 murals by acclaimed Hawai‘i artist Isami Enomoto depicting labor in the islands. The bank did not want to keep the murals, and when none of the state’s established art institutions were able to accept them, Docomomo Hawai‘i assumed responsibility for the preservation of these artistically and historically important murals. The Bank of Hawaii donated the artwork, which was appraised at $50,000, to the organization. To date Docomomo Hawai`i has spent $5,000 for the moving, crating, and storage of the works, which range in size from 6'-8"x6'-6" to 11'-2"x6'-2 , with the largest piece estimated to weigh 650 pounds. Happily, Docomomo Hawai‘i has found a home for the murals at the Center for Labor Education at West Oahu College, which has agreed to publicly display them, and Docomomo is raising funds to prepare the wall, and clean, repair, move and install the them. The goal is to preserve and share this unique modern art with the people of Hawai‘i. THE ART: Rendered in a style reminiscent of Depression Era public works art projects, these five murals by Isami Enomoto depict laborers and occupations, vividly capturing an important moment in Hawai‘i's history. Commissioned by the [...]

2017-04-21T01:00:51+00:00 April 11th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Volunteer at Loko Paaiau Fishpond on Earth Day

HHF In the Field Last week, HHF staff participated in the annual Cultural Resources Management meetings with Navy Region Hawai`i and Marine Corps Base Hawai`i this week. The 4 days of meetings and site visits are held to review all preservation actions from the previous year and prepare for coordination for anticipated projects in the coming year. The meetings included an opportunity for site visits to nearby historical and cultural sites and a memorable one was the trip to Loko Paaiau fishpond which is about 400 years old. Volunteer to help clean up the fishpond on Earth Day, April 22, from 9:00 a.m. to Noon Sailors and local volunteers pick invasive mangroves out of the ground during a July 18 cleanup at the ancient fishpond, Loko Pa’aiau, at McGrew Point Navy housing on Oahu. The fishpond restoration started September 2014 and is an ongoing cultural resources project involving the Navy and the local community. U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Laurie Dexter The Navy and the Aiea Native Hawaiian Civic Club are partnering to clean up the Loko Paaiau fishpond. Volunteer for clean-up efforts this Earth Day and help remove invasive vegetation and plant native vegetation.  Other volunteer activities may include trash pick up and restoration of the makai wall and other features.     Volunteers will be briefed on the archaeological and cultural background of the fishpond, natural resources of the area and storm water issues. They'll be time for question and answers and light snacks will be provided. To volunteer, contact Jeff Pantaleo, 471-1171 X368 / jeff.pantaleo@navy.mil by April 17.  

2017-04-21T01:00:52+00:00 April 3rd, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Historic Hawai‘i Foundation is pleased to present the 2017 Preservation Honor Awards

Please join us in celebrating achievements in preservation and the people who made them possible. The event will be held on Friday, May 19th at the YWCA Laniakea Fuller Hall and Courtyard. The event will include a presentation of the awards and reception to follow with heavy pūpū in the outdoor courtyard.

2017-03-30T23:28:24+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Featured A|

Camp Tarawa Then and Now

Camp Tarawa Today by Fred Greguras Kamuela (Waimea) is located at the intersection of the Mamalahoa Highway (Highway 190) and Kawaihae Road (Highway 19) in the northwest part of the island of Hawai’i.  In 1943, it was a small town of about 400 called Kamuela and its residents were almost totally dependent on the Parker Ranch for their livelihood. Camp Tarawa was located on Parker Ranch property in and around Kamuela from 1943-1945.  The camp was between the volcanic peaks of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. The Marines and Seabees were at four locations: the camp main side at Kamuela; the artillery camp at Pohakuloa; the amtrac camp at Hapuna Beach and the division rear at the port facilities in Hilo. Most unit headquarters, tent camps, mess halls, clubs, recreation facilities, warehouses, etc. were located at main side.  There were large outlying training areas surrounding the camps for small arms practice, an artillery range, amphibious training and other purposes.   Main Side, Camp Tarawa, 1944-45 The 2nd Marine Division was sent to Camp Tarawa in December, 1943 after the World War II battle of Tarawa to recuperate, get replacements and train for the Saipan and Tinian campaigns in the Pacific. The 2nd Marine Division named their camp after the brutal battle they had just fought to honor the Marines who died there. The division departed from Camp Tarawa in the spring, 1944. The 5th Marine Division used Camp Tarawa beginning in the fall, 1944 to train for the assault on Iwo Jima. The 5th Marine Division left the camp in late December, 1944 and returned to the camp in March 1945 after the battle of Iwo Jima to recover, get replacements and prepare [...]

2017-04-21T01:00:52+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

2016 Preservation Honor Awards Celebrate Heritage Protection Achievements

The 2016 Preservation Honor Awards were presented on May 27 for exemplary achievements related to preservation, rehabilitation, restoration and interpretation of the state’s historic and cultural resources.

2017-03-30T15:17:54+00:00 March 26th, 2017|Categories: Education Programs|

The Mana of Place, A Poem

The Mana of Place There’s a mana in the air of historic places Intangible yet present. Distinct. Sometimes abrupt. A secret storyteller. Resolute. Forceful. Needy in its urge to share Happenings, unfoldings, chains of events that led there, To its vibratory memory marking what occurred. #PlacesTellStories  #ThisPlaceMatters  #HawaiiNei

2017-03-22T15:35:38+00:00 March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Public Advocacy Efforts Help Pass County Resolution for Kapaia Swinging Bridge

UPDATE ON KAPAIA SWINGING BRIDGE We're happy to report that rapid response from the public showing support for the Kauai County Council resolution to transfer ownership of the bridge to the Kapaia Foundation was successful!  On March 22, 2017, the Council unanimously passed Resolution 2017-23. Next steps? Kapaia Foundation will submit the grant application for the $231,000 the Council appropriated for the bridge in 2006, and hope to start rebuilding within the next couple of months.  We'll keep you posted. ADVOCACY ALERT - March, 20, 2017 Kapaia Swinging Bridge was added to the list of Hawaii’s Most Endangered Historic Site in 2011 and remains vulnerable.  Please lend your support by submitting testimony in favor of a resolution which will be voted on at the Kauai County Council on March 22. The resolution will transfer ownership, responsibility and funding for the bridge to the Kapaia Foundation who seek to preserve and restore it. HISTORY OF THE BRIDGE Imagine daily life in the 1920s in Kapaia Valley in the Territory of Kauai, where most of the plantation villagers traveled by foot because they could not afford to own an automobile.  Back then the foot bridge across Kapaia Stream was heavily trafficked by Kapaia residents who used it to go to and from work, school, shopping and social time with relatives and neighbors.   Completed in 1948, it connected two communities in Kapaia Valley: the east side was home to the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, a Filipino “camp”, Hawaiian and Japanese families, taro and rice fields; the west side was home to the Līhu‘e Hongwanji Buddhist Temple, Korean Methodist Church, Chinese Church, Naganuma Store, Ogata Store, Moriwake and Ah Chock’s Store.  The Kapaia Swinging Bridge is listed on the [...]

2017-03-30T17:47:13+00:00 March 21st, 2017|Categories: Blog|

Historic Kaupō School – Rugged Beauty and Solid Community

Site Visit Reveals a Community Steeped in History and Pride of Place February 19, 2017 Kaupō, located on the remote southeastern end of Maui, has a population of about 100 full-time residents but is embraced by thousands of visitors who pass by on the route between Hāna and Haleakalā National Park in Kīpahulu.  The residents are mostly descendants of Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) whose families have lived in this area for countless generations.  This is off-the-grid territory.  The stars are brilliant on clear nights as power lines do not exist out here. As one can imagine in such an exquisitely beautiful and remote place, community is small and tight. One could almost imagine the phrase “it takes a village” written for this special place.  The Kaupō Community Association’s (KCA) mission—to preserve the natural beauty, environmental resources and rural lifestyle of the Kaupō community—fits well into this terrain. Central to this place is Kaupō School, which is steeped in history.  Since its establishment in 1887, the school has served as the only government institution in a remote, isolated landscape. The two-room classroom building and associated Teacher’s Cottage were built in 1922-23. Keiki learned Hawaiian first here, along with other skills such as fishing, hunting and horseback riding. The school is significant to this remote community as both a gathering place and a link to the ranching and agricultural culture of Kaupō. Kaupō School is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (https://historichawaii.org/2014/03/03/kaupo-school/). The community’s wish is to rehabilitate both the classroom building and the teacher’s cottage into a community center and a shelter to provide safety during storms, floods, earthquakes and other emergencies.  With this in mind, the Kaupō Community Association has taken steps forward [...]

2017-05-11T09:49:25+00:00 February 24th, 2017|Categories: Blog|

The Līhu‘e Community Steps Up to Save Their Historic Post Office!

Public Meeting Draws Crowds, Campaign Provides Guidance on Direct Action About 150 Līhu‘e residents attended the United States Postal Service public meeting at Kaua‘i War Memorial Convention Hall on February 23 to learn more about the USPS desire to relocate daily operations at Līhu‘e Post Office. (Click here to read more about why the post office is being slated for possible closure.) In the weeks prior to the meeting, a public awareness and action campaign, “Save Our Post Office”, was launched by Pat Griffin of the Līhu‘e Business Association and other local leaders in collaboration with Historic Hawai‘i Foundation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation. A team on the ground in Līhu‘e, led by Griffin, canvassed door to door rallying support. Members of the community signed coconuts with messages such as “Closing Līhu‘e Post Office is Nuts!” and postcards pre-printed with a plea to the USPS to maintain the post office as it remains a key component of Līhu‘e’s economically vibrant historic core. Lihue resident holding signed post card in support of keeping Lihue Post Office open.   Continued action, most importantly submitting written comments to Dean Cameron, the USPS representative in San Francisco, postmarked prior to March 25, is vital to send a clear, impactful message that a large segment of the public opposes the post office’s closure. Līhu‘e residents, HHF and the National Trust are calling out to the statewide preservation community for support. Click here for 5 quick, simple, direct actions you can take to let the USPS know you want the historic Līhu‘e Post Office to remain open and in service to the downtown community.

2017-04-21T01:00:52+00:00 February 24th, 2017|Categories: Blog|