Hanalei Pier Canopy (2012) SAVED

UPDATE: SAVED IN 2013

The rebuilt canopy at the end of Hanalei Pier recently reopened after a reconstruction project was completed by the Rotary Club of Hanalei Bay.

Prior to the reconstruction effort, which began in March and concluded in May, the canopy suffered from dry rot and cracked beams, holes in the roof and broken support struts. The State Department of Land & Natural Resources, Kaua’i Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation planned to demolish the structure, prompting HHF to declare it an Endangered Historic Place.

The Rotary Club of Hanalei Bay established a “Save the Pier” project involving the community, the State of Hawai‘i, and the County of Kaua‘i to preserve the historic and community landmark. Members worked with the state’s Department of Land and Natural Resources on reconstruction plans while raising money to restore what has become a symbol of Hanalei Bay. Rotary Club raised more than $188,000 to rebuild and provide upkeep to the community icon.

Originally constructed of wood, the Hanalei Pier has been in existence since 1892. In the early 20th century, the pier was a major hub for the transportation of rice, sugar and various goods between the other Hawaiian Islands and the rest of the world via the Pacific Ocean. It became a recreational resource in the last 80 years when shipping halted and is a popular venue for fishing, picnics and filming.

LISTED AS ENDANGERED IN 2012

Article Written By: Kathryn Drury Wagner

What is it?
Originally built for rice transportation, this picturesque pier is now valued for recreational use. “It’s a historic part of Hanelei and it’s important to the community for fishing and picnicking,” says Barbara Robeson, a longtime resident and a consultant on preservation projects. A canopy at the pier’s end is integral to its look.

What threatens it?
The pier was reconstructed in the 1990s and is in good shape, but the large canopied area at the end of the pier shed is not. :”you have the roof broken apart, the posts are rotting. It’s very dangerous,” says Sally Motta, deputy director of finance for the County of Kaua’i and treasurer for the Rotary Club of Hanalei Foundation. The Rotary Club of Hanalei has been raising funds in preparation to either fix or replace the structure. Joe Borden, of the State Department of Land & Natural Resources, Kaua’i division of Boating and Ocean Recreation, says the department plans to demolish the structure.

What can be done?
When the demolition goes through, likely this fall, all is not lost, says Borden. The state plans to partner with the Rotary in an “adopt-a-harbor” type arrangement. Borden says the state will pay for the demolition, and the Rotary will rebuild the canopy. Motta says the Rotary has raised $127,000 in donations for the product so far. “We know it will take at least $150,000. Leftover money will be put in a fund for maintenance and repair. These funds are coming from people in our community and from visitors, people who have been coming here for years. I’ve never been so impressed or proud of a community.”

Photos: Courtesy of David Croxford; Library of Congress

2017-04-21T01:01:46+00:00 March 3rd, 2014|Categories: MES Kauai|Tags: , |